Alcohol-related liver disease

Alcohol-related liver disease- Common Health Tips

Did you ever think that what will happen if your liver stops working? Yes, you are thinking right, when your liver stops working you will have to face numerous health related problems. The liver is the largest organ of your body. It is located under your rib cage on the right side. The liver performs many functions in your body such as it filters the toxins from blood, breaks down proteins and produces bile which helps the body to absorb fats. Your liver also helps the body to get rid of waste products. It plays a vital role in fighting infections, especially in the case of constipation. Liver also helps in hormones production, regulating cholesterol level and sugar level.

Drinking alcohol can increase your risk of developing liver diseases. It cause irreparable damage to this important part of your body. When a person consumes excess alcohol over the course of decades, the body starts to replace the liver’s healthy tissues with scar tissues. In the meantime, excess consumption of alcohol can damage your liver, muscles, brain and other tissues of the body. alcohol liver damageAlcohol changes the function of each cell in which it enters. When your liver tries to breakdown the alcohol, it results in chemical reactions. That reactions can damage its cells.

This damage can lead to inflammation and scarring to the liver.Women metabolize alcohol more slowly than men, so they are more prone to the risk of liver diseases. Women, who consume larger amount of alcohol and carry excess body weight, have a greater chance of developing chronic liver diseases and at the same time mortality rate will also get increased.

Generally, alcohol –related liver disease (ARLD) does not cause symptoms until the liver has severely damaged. When this happens, the symptoms include feeling sick, weight loss, decreased appetite, bloody vomiting and swelling in the ankle may occur. There are commonly three types of liver diseases  such as alcoholic fatty liver disease, alcoholic hepatitis and alcoholic cirrhosis.

When your liver tries to breakdown the alcohol, it results in chemical reactions that can damage its cells and this damage can lead to inflammation and scarring to the liver. Women metabolize alcohol more slowly than men, so they are more prone to the risk of liver diseases. Women, who consume larger amount of alcohol and carry excess body weight, have a greater chance of developing chronic liver diseases and at the same time mortality rate will also get increased.

Generally, alcohol –related liver disease (ARLD) does not cause symptoms until the liver has severely damaged. When this happens, the symptoms include feeling sick, weight loss, decreased appetite, bloody vomiting and swelling in the ankle may occur. There are commonly three types of alcohol-related liver diseases such as alcoholic fatty liver disease, alcoholic hepatitis, and alcoholic cirrhosis.

Alcoholic fatty liver diseases -:

Drinking a large amount of alcohol even just for few days can lead to build up of fats in the liver. This is called alcoholic fatty liver disease and this is the first stage of ARLD. Fatty liver disease rarely causes any symptom but this is a warning sign that you are drinking at a harmful level.

fatty liver disease stagesAlcoholic hepatitis -:

Second one is alcoholic hepatitis. It is a potentially serious condition which caused due to excess drinking of alcohol over a longer period of time. When this develops, it may be the first time when people feel that they are damaging their liver through alcohol. This stage is usually reversible if you stop drinking permanently.

Alcoholic cirrhosis -:

Last stage of ARLD is alcoholic cirrhosis where the liver becomes significantly scarred. This is a life threating condition. In the early stage of this condition, the patient may feel tired and weak, lose weight, loss of appetite and have itchy skin. It is generally not reversible, but stopping drinking immediately can prevent from further damage and increase your life expectancy.

There is currently no treatment available for ARLD. The most effective treatment is to stop drinking, preferably for rest of your life or stick to the recommended limits. Men and women should not to regularly drink alcohol more than 14 units in a week. This reduces the risk of further damage to your liver and gives it the best chances to recover. If a person is dependent on alcohol, quitting drinking can be very difficult. Therefore, support advice and medical treatment are available which can help the person in quitting alcohol.

Good nutrition is also very helpful to recover your liver and boosts your immune power. If you want a healthy life, you need to do some efforts otherwise your liver will stop working and your life expectancy will decrease. Talk to your doctor if you think that you have a problem with drinking alcohol and at the risk of developing liver diseases. They can refer you the programs which help you stop drinking and improve the health of your liver.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *